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Germany or Germania and the Goths

Resources on the various Germanic warrior tribes, their migrations into Europe, and their invasions of the Goths and Vandals.
  1. Jordanes

Hun-Driven Barbarian Invasions and Migrations Into the Roman Empire
Read about the main tribes that moved into Roman territory thanks to the Huns.

German Migrations Map
A map showing the ancient tribal migrations of people described as Germanic.

Germania - Tacitus' Work on Germany
An English translation of Germania, Tacitus' book on Germany.

Germany Map
A map of the Roman province of Germania (Germany), showing tribal groupings.

Atilla and the Huns
In 1948, when E.A. Thompson wrote The Huns, he took two indiosyncratic stances: One, that he would not take sides in the debate over the possible Chinese origins of the nomadic people commonly associated with the Fall of Rome. Two, that Attila was a diplomatic bungler and military leader whose victories only came when there was no real opposition.

Germany
The Germanic tribes, which probably originated from a mixture of peoples along the Baltic Sea coast, inhabited the northern part of the European continent by about 500 B.C.

Chapter XXXIX: Gothic Kingdom Of Italy.
From Edward Gibbon's History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, this chapter describes the years following the ousting of the last "Roman" emperor in the west, and the government of a Gothic king, Theodoric the Ostrogoth.

History of the Vandals
Article, by Brian Adam, on the Vandals in North Africa and their defeat by Belisarius.

Tacitus De Germania
William Harris' introduction to this book by Tacitus published under Trajan around A.D. 98. Aside from Caesar's remarks, it is the only written source we have on the early Germans. Page contains the entier Latin text.

Tacitus: The Germania, Excerpts
Excerpts from Tacitus' book on Germany highlighting the physical characteristics of the Germans, their government and the influence of women, punishment, administration of justice, and food.

Ovid's Amores Book 1.14
In this elegy mention is made of German captives' hair.

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