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Readers Respond: Your Understanding of the Latin Abbreviation SPQR

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From the article: What Does SPQR Stand For?
SPQR translates into English as "the Senate and the Roman people" but what exactly do the individual letters S, P, Q, and R stand for? Do they stand for, for instance, Senatus Populusque Quiritum Romanorum or Senatus Populusque Romanorum or something else? Please post your understanding of these initials and why you think your version is better than the others. What Is It and Why

Ed B

SPQR- my old Latin teacher said it meant Sents Populus-Quorum Romanus..or the gathering of the people's senate of Rome. The quorumword is used in congresses all in US and Europe or any gathering to vote must have quorum...enough represntatives for the vote ot be valid. No Roamn law or army mandate was valid unles enough senators were present to vote for it or against it.
—Guest Ed bianqui

SENATUS POPULUS QUADIS ROMANI

I read on a magazine about the film Gladiator that it meant: From senate to the people of rome.
—Guest SPQR

Sulla Potentia Quicumque Roma

Fools, it originated from Sulla. "Sulla is the Authority of Everyone in Rome".
—Guest Sulla

Reform The Resistance

I believe it means Glory to the Senate representing the people of ROME.
—Guest Reifte Diavlo

SPQR

SPQR, translated into English means "The Senate and The People of Rome. In Latin, it stands for Senatus Populusque Romanus.
—Guest Sarah

S.P.Q.R.

First off, there are LOTS of other ancient, true resources you can use to find the answer to this. It is an obvious answer of thia: In Latin, Senātus is a nominative singular noun meaning "Senate". Populusque is compounded from the nominative noun Populus, "the People", and -que, an enclitic particle meaning "and" which connects the two nominative nouns. The last word, Rōmānus ("Roman") is an adjective modifying Populus: the "Roman People".
—Guest Bebe

S.P.Q.R

FROM MY LATIN DAYS "QUE" APPENDED TO A NOUN MEANS "AND" LINKING THE NOUN TO THE IMMEDIATE PRECEEDING "NOUN". HENCE SENATUS PUBLICUSQUE STANDS FOR SENATE AND PEOPLE ( OF ROME)
—Guest PATRICK

S.P.Q.R

I have found a bracelet at my late Mothers In Laws with lots of little coins on it there us also a charm on the bracelet that states S.P.Q.R. and as I am from England, I have been wondering what it stood for. So thank you for explaining
—Guest An

MODERN ITALIAN TRANSLATION OF "SPQR"

"SONO PORCI QUESTA ROMANI" (THESE ROMANS ARE PIGS)
—Guest VINCE

Proper english

In proper English, it should be "Senate of Roman People."
—Guest Lucas

Something completely different

I have always believed it stood for something totally different. Forgive my Latin but I was taught as a child in England and remember from my earliest acquaintance with Roman history that spqr stood for Senators Praetors Quaestors Romani. This seems to be unique among the responses here but does not on the face of it seem completely absurd. Has anyone else heard this one?
—Monovian

SPQR

Actually que is added to a Latin noun to mean "and". In addition, I was always taught in Latin class that it is correctly written in Latin as Senatus Populusque Romani, not Romanus. This is because as a second declension noun the possessive of Romanus is Romani. It is not an adjective but a noun. If it wee Senatus Populusque Romanus it would be translated Roman Senate and People.
—Guest CEM

SPQR - “Senatus Populusque Romanus“,

In my opinion the "abreviation" of SPQR simply means the Senate & people of Rome - The Q stems from "Que" in this instance meaning "OF" - Latin Grammer will hold up this theory and it is the only logical transcription feasable - Quirites can be disgarded as the Q in favour of Que meaning of Rome
—Guest Logicas Maximus

thank you

always wanted to know what SPQR meant. i love to learn about this period, tis my passion. thank you everybody.
—Guest learning history

Perche no?

My Italian professor once suggested it meant Sono Porchi Questi Romani (They are pigs, these Romans)
—Guest Smart291

What Is It and Why

Your Understanding of the Latin Abbreviation SPQR

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